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Nascar will run on a gazoline/ethanol blend December 9, 2010

Posted by mytruthaboutoil in Geostrategy, Oil (general).
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Who said the United States did not care about environmental issues? Nascar competition will now be ran on a blend of gazoline (85%) and ethanol (15%). When American midwest is becoming green…

Missouri corn farmers, ethanol producers and racing fans received welcomed news last week when the National Association for Stock Car Auto Racing officials, announced its official fuel transition to a cleaner, greener ethanol blend. Beginning with the 2011 racing season, all NASCAR Camping World Trucks Series, NASCAR Nationwide Series and NASCAR Sprint Cup Series races will be fueled by Sunoco Green E15 (15% ethanol, 85% gasoline). 

NASCAR joined Growth Energy and the National Corn Growers Association in making the announcement at a special live simulcast press conference on Dec. 2, which was beamed to 14 sites across the country, including Columbia, Mo. Legendary driver Rusty Wallace participated in the event, as well as NASCAR CEO Brian France.

“This is exciting news for corn growers,” noted Kevin Hurst, a grain farmer from Tarkio, who serves on the Missouri Corn Growers Association and Missouri Corn Merchandising Council boards of directors. “With NASCAR’s sprawling fan base, this partnership provides farmers a great platform to educate consumers nationwide about the value of corn-based ethanol.”

NASCAR’s American Ethanol initiative was developed as part of their ongoing efforts to make the motor sport more environmentally friendly. A cleaner, greener alternative to oil, E15 will reduce engine emissions and the consumption of gasoline while supporting a homegrown, renewable fuel. Further, all ethanol blended for Sunoco Green E15 will come from U.S. corn ethanol producers, supporting American jobs and investing dollars in our local economies.  

“Missouri growers, along with farmers across the nation, are the most productive in the world,” Hurst said. “We are working hard to help provide a clean, renewable alternative to foreign oil, while producing more than enough corn to meet all feed, food and export needs.”

According to NASCAR, teams have been testing E15 in their engines for several months and found no measurable difference in horsepower compared to the current fuel configuration. NASCAR officials anticipate a seamless transition to the greener fuel, while maintaining the same great racing, high performance and drivability when the green flags drop in February.

“Not only does this partnership showcase American farmers’ ability to feed and fuel the world, but it will highlight the strong performance of ethanol,” Hurst said.  “From mom’s minivan, to farm trucks, to the race car, E15 works.”

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Comments»

1. scopefinance - December 11, 2010

There is nothing green in the E85 (15% Ethanol, 85% Gasoline)because both ethanol and gasoline they produce after combustion the same carbon dioxide quantities. The group who first qualified the ethanol, corn based, as a green fuel is a liar however this was good for greedy corn producers. Moreover more and more agricultural areas are used to produce corn and other agricultural products to manufacture ethanol and diesel oil (which is all but biodiesel as it produces same amount of pollution) for cars which will definitely lead to starvation. One should know that the ethanol or “biodiesel” consumption of one SUV per year necessitates the transformation of a quantity of food stuff (corn, soya oil, palm oil, sugar cane,…) corresponding to the needs of a thousand human beings!


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